Tyr

Locations – City-States
Balic
Draj
Gulg
Nibenay
Raam
Tyr
Urik
Population: 15,000 (66% human, 15% dwarves, 7% elves, 6% half-giants, 6% muls)
Water: 17 public wells, managed by the templarate’s Ministry of Water;
citizens may claim one hand-carried container of water per day
Supplies: Exports iron and silk; imports cloth, wheat, wood, and slaves
Ruler: King Kalak, also known as the Tyrant of Tyr

Tyr is a modest city by the standards of the city-states, but it is a prosperous one. Situated over a great aquifer that collects runoff from the Ringing Mountains, the city draws up water from a series of wells, which quench the thirst of its many hard-working slaves. Tyrian slaves work the fields outside of the city to raise faro, bulis, and other food crops from the parched ground, but the true wealth of Tyr is in its iron mines, two days’ journey from the city. Tyrian iron, scraped from the earth and smelted at great cost in workers and tools, gives the city its edge (literally and figuratively) in trade and war: the various dynastic merchant houses and city-states all hunger for Tyr’s iron for their tools and weapons, and Tyr’s small army and slave warrior force is armed with iron-tipped spears that are more than a match for the obsidian weapons of Urik or the wooden swords of Gulg or Nibenay.

The templars of Tyr wear distinctive black cassocks, and are often accompanied by hired warriors. Tyrian templars often travel in small groups when enforcing the law, and are quick to pronounce judgments of slavery upon suspected criminals in order to feed the constant demand for laborers in the iron mines.

In the past year, King Kalak has undertaken the construction of a massive ziggurat that towers over the rest of the city, even dwarfing the Golden Palace where the sorcerer-king himself resides. Construction on this ziggurat has claimed so much labor and material that the iron trade from Tyr’s mines has slowed to a halt, and workers of all sorts are conscripted to the construction at the whim and whip of the templars. The dynastic merchant houses and the sorcerer-kings of other neighboring city-states have become increasingly unhappy with the drought in the iron trade, and significant economic or military consequences may result if Kalak’s obession prevents Tyr from resuming its normal trade soon.

Tyr

Tyr

The Water Margin JesseHeinig